Category: general

Dissertation Works Cited

Next month I will be defending my dissertation. This means I have to send it off to my committee this week. So since I had to get my chapters all together and formatted, I thought I would go ahead and share my works cited in case anyone is interested:

 

Aarseth, Espen. 1997. Cybertext: Perspectives on Ergodic Literature. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

———. 2001. “Computer Game Studies, Year One.” Game Studies. July. http://www.gamestudies.org/0101/editorial.html.

Albertson, Tim, and Stuart Selwood. 1998. “Rows, Isles or Peninsulas? An Analysis of Computer Laboratory Layouts in Schools.” New Zealand Journal of Applied Computing and Information Technology 2 (1): 82–89.

Auslander, Philip. 2008. Liveness: Performance in a Mediatized Culture. 2nd ed. London ; New York: Routledge.

———. 2012. “Digital Liveness: A Historico-Philosophical Perspective.” PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art 34 (3) (August 27): 3–11. doi:10.1162/PAJJ_a_00106.

Barley, Stephen R. 1986. “Technology as an Occasion for Structuring: Evidence from Observations of CT Scanners and the Social Order of Radiology Departments.” Administrative Science Quarterly 31 (1) (March 1): 78–108.

Bauman, Richard. 1975. “Verbal Art as Performance.” American Anthropologist 77 (2): 290–311.

Boellstorff, Tom. 2008. Coming of Age in Second Life: An Anthropologist Explores the Virtually Human. Princeton Univ Pr.

Bonilla-Silva, Eduardo. 2001. White Supremacy and Racism in the Post-Civil Rights Era. Boulder: Lynne Rienner Pub.

———. 2002. “The Linguistics of Color Blind Racism: How to Talk Nasty About Blacks Without Sounding ‘Racist’.” Critical Sociology 28 (1-2) (January 1): 41 –64. doi:10.1177/08969205020280010501.

Bourdon, Jérôme. 2000. “Live Television Is Still Alive: On Television as an Unfulfilled Promise.” Media, Culture & Society 22 (5) (September 1): 531–556. doi:10.1177/016344300022005001.

Bowery, Jim. 2008. “Spasim (1974) The First First-Person-Shooter 3D Multiplayer Online Game.” December 30. http://www.oocities.com/jim_bowery/spasim.html.

Bruckman, Amy, and Mitchel Resnick. 1995. “The MediaMOO Project.” Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies 1 (1) (March 1): 94 –109. doi:10.1177/135485659500100110.

Bruner, Edward M. 1963. “Encounters: Two Studies in the Sociology of Interaction. Erving Goffman.” American Anthropologist 65 (6): 1416–1417.

Butler, Judith. 2003. “Performative Acts and Gender Constitution: An Essay In Phenomenology and Feminist Theory.” In The Feminism and Visual Culture Reader, edited by Amelia Jones, 392–402. New York: Routledge.

BXBomber. 2004. “X-Band (SNES) FAQ.” June 17. http://www.gamefaqs.com/snes/588872-x-band/faqs/30773.

Chan, Dean. 2010. “Dead-in-Iraq: The Spatial Politics of Digital Game Art Activism and the In-Game Protest.” In Joystick Soldiers: The Politics of Play in Military Video Games, edited by Nina Huntemann and Matthew Thomas Payne, 272–286. New York: Routledge.

Colley, Steve. 2006. “Steve Colley’s Story of the Original Maze.” DigiBarn Computer Museum. February 18. http://www.digibarn.com/history/04-VCF7-MazeWar/stories/colley.html.

Connell, R. W. 1987. Gender and Power: Society, the Person and Sexual Politics. Stanford University Press. http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/redirect?tag=citeulike09-20&path=ASIN/0804714304.

———. 2005. Masculinities. Second. Berkeley: University of California Press. http://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520246980.

Connell, R. W., and James W. Messerschmidt. 2005. “Hegemonic Masculinity: Rethinking the Concept.” Gender Society 19 (6): 829–859.

Conroy, David, Peta Wyeth, and Daniel Johnson. 2012. “Spotting the Difference: Identifying Player Opponent Preferences in FPS Games.” In Entertainment Computing – ICEC 2012, edited by Marc Herrlich, Rainer Malaka, and Maic Masuch, 7522:114–121. Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-33542-6_10.

Consalvo, Mia. 2007. Cheating: Gaining Advantage in Videogames. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

Crogan, Patrick, and Espen Aarseth. 2003. “Games, Simulation & Serious Fun: An Interview With Espen Aarseth.” SCAN | Journal of Media Arts Culture. May 16. http://scan.net.au/scan/journal/display.php?journal_id=20.

Curtis, Pavel. 1992. “Mudding: Social Phenomena in Text-Based Virtual Realities.” In Proceedings of Directions and Implications of Advanced Computing (DIAC’92) Symposium. California. http://w2.eff.org/Net_culture/MOO_MUD_IRC/curtis_mudding.article.

Daleske, John, and Gary Fritz. 2008. “How Empire Came to Be.” PLATO Empire — Timeline. http://www.daleske.com/plato/empire.php.

Dibbell, Julian. 1993. “A Rape in Cyberspace.” Village Voice. December 23. http://www.villagevoice.com/2005-10-18/specials/a-rape-in-cyberspace/.

Donovan, Tristan. 2010. Replay: the History of Video Games. East Sussex  England: Yellow Ant.

DR_Bone. 1997. “John Carmack InterviewBy DR.” Blues News. January 8. http://www.bluesnews.com/articles/carmackinterview.html.

Ducheneaut, Nicolas, Robert J. Moore, and Eric Nickell. 2007. “Virtual ‘third Places’: A Case Study of Sociability in Massively Multiplayer Games.” Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing 16 (1) (February): 129–166.

Dyer, Richard. 1997. White: Essays on Race and Culture. New York: Routledge.

Erard, Michael. 2004. “2 Decades Later; Let Down by Academia, Game Pioneer Changed Paths – New York Times.” New York Times. May 6. http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/06/technology/2-decades-later-let-down-by-academia-game-pioneer-changed-paths.html.

Eskelinen, Markku. 2001. “The Gaming Situation.” Gamestudies.org. July. http://www.gamestudies.org/0101/eskelinen/.

Feagin, Joe R. 2006. Systemic Racism: A Theory of Oppression. New York: Routledge.

Feagin, Joe R. 2010. The White Racial Frame: Centuries of Racial Framing and Counter-Framing. New York: Routledge.

Folkestad, James, and James Banning. 2009. “Promoting Collaboration: The Physical Arrangement of Library Computers.” Library Hi Tech News 26 (1/2): 18–19. doi:10.1108/07419050910966490.

Frasca, Gonzalo. 1999. “Ludology Meets Narratology:  Similitude and Differences Between (Video)Games and Narrative.” Ludology.org. http://www.ludology.org/articles/ludology.htm.

———. 2001. “What Is Ludology? A Provisory Definition.” Ludology.org. July 8. http://www.ludology.org/2001/07/what-is-ludolog.html.

———. 2003. “What Is This Ludology Thing After All?” Ludology.org. April 2. http://replay.web.archive.org/20061014195516/http://ludology.org/article.php?story=200304021240471.

Gabbard, Ralph, Anthony Kaiser, and David Kaunelis. 2007. “Redesigning a Library Space for Collaborative Learning.” Computers in Libraries 27 (5) (May): 6–11.

Gajadhar, B. J., Y. A. W. de Kort, W. A. IJsselsteijn, and K. Poels. 2009. “Where Everybody Knows Your Game: The Appeal and Function of Game Cafés in Western Europe.” In Proceedings of the International Conference on Advances in Computer Enterntainment Technology, 28–35. Athens, Greece: ACM.

Gajadhar, Brian, Yvonne de Kort, and Wijnand IJsselsteijn. 2008. “Influence of Social Setting on Player Experience of Digital Games.” In CHI’08 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 3099–3104. ACM.

Gajadhar, Brian J., Yvonne AW de Kort, and Wijnand A. Ijsselsteijn. 2008. “Shared Fun Is Doubled Fun: Player Enjoyment as a Function of Social Setting.” In Fun and Games, 106–117. Springer.

Gettler, Joe. 2008. “The First Video Game?: Before ‘Pong,’ There Was ‘Tennis For Two’.” September 18. http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/history/higinbotham.asp.

Goffman, Erving. 1961. Encounters: Two Studies in the Sociology of Interaction. Macmillan Pub Co.

———. 1966. Behavior in Public Places: Notes on Teh Social Organization of Gatherings. New York: Free Press.

———. 1979. “Footing.” Semiotica 25 (1-2): 1–30.

———. 1990. The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life. New York [N.Y.]: Doubleday.

Goldsmith, Jr., Thomas T., and Estele Ray Mann. “Cathode-Ray Tube Amusement Device”. New Jersey. http://www.google.com/patents?id=n-NZAAAAEBAJ&zoom=4&dq=Cathode%20ray%20tube%20amusement%20device&pg=PA3#v=onepage&q=Cathode%20ray%20tube%20amusement%20device&f=false.

Good, Owen. 2011. “Well, That’s One Way to Combat Misogyny in Gaming.” Kotaku. July 23. http://kotaku.com/5824084/well-thats-one-way-to-combat-misogyny-in-gaming.

Griffiths, Mark D., Mark NO Davies, and Darren Chappell. 2004. “Online Computer Gaming: A Comparison of Adolescent and Adult Gamers.” Journal of Adolescence 27 (1): 87–96.

Guadagno, Rosanna E., Jim Blascovich, Jeremy N. Bailenson, and Cade Mccall. 2007. “Virtual Humans and Persuasion: The Effects of Agency and Behavioral Realism.” Media Psychology 10 (1): 1–22.

Gusa, Diane Lynn. 2010. “White Institutional Presence: The Impact of Whiteness on Campus Climate.” Harvard Educational Review 80 (4) (December 1): 464–490.

Heeter, Carrie. 1992. “Being There: The Subjective Experience of Presence.” Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments 1 (2): 262–271.

Horowitz, Ken. 2006. “Disconnected: The TeleGenesis Modem.” Sega 16. November 10. http://www.sega-16.com/2006/11/disconnected-the-telegenesis-modem/.

Horst, Heather, and Daniel Miller. 2006. The Cell Phone: An Anthropology of Communication. New York: Berg Publishers.

“How to Connect Xbox 360 Consoles Together for System Link Play.” 2012. Xbox. March 1. http://support.xbox.com/en-US/xbox-360/settings-and-initial-setup/connect-xbox-360-consoles-together-for-system-link-play-910583.

“Intel Bans Doom!” 1994. Computer Gaming World, March.

Ipsos MediaCT. 2012. “2012 Essential Facts About the Computer and Video Game Industry.” http://www.theesa.com/facts/pdfs/ESA_EF_2012.pdf.

Iverson, Andrew. 2010. “Utilikilts Original Black Front.” Flickr. July 29. http://www.flickr.com/photos/tfangel/4841089597/.

Jennings, James. 2008. “Tokenism.” In Encyclopedia of Race and Ethnic Studies, edited by Ernest Cashmore, 421–422. London; New York: Routledge.

Jenson, Jennifer, and Suzanne de Castell. 2010. “Gender, Simulation, and Gaming: Research Review and Redirections.” Simulation & Gaming 41 (1): 51–71.

Jonsson, Fatima. 2010. “A Public Place of Their Own. A Fieldstudy of a Game Café as a Third Place.” In Proceedings of DiGRA Nordic 2010: Experiencing Games: Games, Play, and Players. Stockholm. http://www.digra.org:8080/Plone/dl/display_html?chid=10343.02436.pdf.

Jonsson, Fatima, and Harko Verhagen. 2011a. “Senses Working Overtime: On Sensuous Experiences and Public Computer Game Play.” In Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology, 56. ACM.

———. 2011b. “Sensing Game Play. Exploring Computer Game Play in a Game Café and a Mass Lan Party.” In Computer Games (CGAMES), 2011 16th International Conference On, 134–141. IEEE.

Kendall, Lori. 1999. “Nerd Nation.” International Journal of Cultural Studies 2 (2): 260 –283. doi:10.1177/136787799900200206.

———. 2002. Hanging Out in the Virtual Pub: Masculinities and Relationships Online. Berkeley: Univ of California Press.

Kent, Steven L. 2001. The Ultimate History of Video Games. Prima Publishing.

Klepek, Patrick. 2912. “When Passions Flare, Lines Are Crossed.” Giant Bomb. February 28. http://www.giantbomb.com/news/when-passions-flare-lines-are-crossed-updated/4006/.

Klevjer, Rune. 2002. “In Defense of Cutscenes.” In Computer Games and Digital Cultures Conference Proceedings, 191–202. Tampere, Finland: Tampere University Press. http://www.digra.org/dl/display_html?chid=05164.50328.pdf.

Koster, Raph. 2002. “Online World Timeline.” Raph Koster’s Website. February 20. http://www.raphkoster.com/gaming/mudtimeline.shtml.

Levy, Donald P. 2007. “Hegemonic Masculinity.” Edited by George Ritzer. Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology. Blackwell Publishing. Blackwell Reference Online. http://www.blackwellreference.com/subscriber/tocnode?id=g9781405124331_chunk_g978140512433114_ss1-22.

Lewis, Amanda E. 2003. Race in the Schoolyard:  Negotiating the Color Line in Classrooms and Communities. New Brunswick, NJ, USA: Rutgers University Press. http://site.ebrary.com/lib/iub/docDetail.action?docID=10075353.

———. 2004. “‘What Group?’ Studying Whites and Whiteness in the Era of ‘Color-Blindness’.” Sociological Theory 22 (4): 623–646. doi:10.1111/j.0735-2751.2004.00237.x.

Lipsitz, George. 1998. The Possessive Investment in Whiteness: How White People Profit from Identity Politics. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Liu, Fengshu. 2009. “It Is Not Merely About Life on the Screen: Urban Chinese Youth and the Internet Cafe.” Journal of Youth Studies 12 (2) (April): 167–184. doi:10.1080/13676260802590386.

Livingstone, Sonia. 2008. “Taking Risky Opportunities in Youthful Content Creation: Teenagers’ Use of Social Networking Sites for Intimacy, Privacy and Self-expression.” New Media & Society 10 (3): 393–411.

Marable, Manning. 2002. “Whither Whiteness?: The Souls of White Folks.” Souls 4 (4): 45–51. doi:10.1080/10999940216618.

Marcotte, Amanda. 2012. “Online Misogyny Reflects Women’s Realities, Though in a Cruder Way Than Is Customary Offline.” June 13. http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2012/06/13/online_misogyny_reflects_women_s_realities_though_in_a_cruder_way_than_is_customary_offline_.html.

Martin, Hayley. 2010. “How Social Context Affects Levels of Immersion: Does Physical Presence Matter?” Unpublished Master of Science Dissertation, University College London.

Meadows, Linda K. 1985. “Ethnography of a Video Arcade: A Study of Children’s Play Behavior and the Learning Process.” Unpublished Dissertation, The Ohio State University.

Mears, Ashley. 2011. Pricing Beauty: The Making of a Fashion Model. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Mills, Charles Wade. 1997. The Racial Contract. Cornell University Press.

Morris, Edward W. 2007. “Researching Race: Identifying a Social Construction through Qualitative Methods and an Interactionist Perspective.” Symbolic Interaction 30 (3) (August): 409–425. doi:10.1525/si.2007.30.3.409.

Morse, Margaret. 1998. Virtualities: Television, Media Art, and Cyberculture. Theories of Contemporary Culture v. 21. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Mumble. 2012. “Mumble.” Mumble. May 18. http://mumble.sourceforge.net/w/index.php?title=Main_Page&oldid=5784.

Neff, Gina, Tim Jordan, and Joshua McVeigh-Schulz. 2012. “Affordances, Technical Agency, and the Politics of Technologies of Cultural Production.” Culture Digitally. http://culturedigitally.org/2012/01/affordances-technical-agency-and-the-politics-of-technologies-of-cultural-production-2/.

Nintendo. 1989. “Gameboy Owner’s Manual.”

Noobsa44. 2004. “Sega Saturn’s Netlink and Directlink!” GameFAQs. April 19. http://www.gamefaqs.com/saturn/916393-saturn/faqs/13876.

Noyes, Dorothy. 1995. “Group.” The Journal of American Folklore 108 (430): 449–478.

Ofstein, Dovid. 1991. “Videorama: An Ethnographic Study of Video Arcades”. University of Akron.

Oldenburg, Ray. 1997. “Our Vanishing Third Places.” Planning Commissioners Journal 25: 7–10.

———. 1999. The Great Good Place. second. Marlowe & Company.

———. 2003. “Third Places.” Edited by Karen Christensen and David Levinson. Encyclopedia of Community: From the Village to the Virtual World. Sage Publications, Inc.

Omi, Michael, and Howard Winant. 1986. Racial Formation in the United States: from the 1960s to the 1980s. New York: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

Orsini, Patty. 2011. “Q&A with Ray Oldenburg, Author and Professor Emeritus of Sociology.” JWT Intelligence. January 26. http://www.jwtintelligence.com/2011/01/qa-ray-oldenburg-author-professor-emeritus/.

Osmond, Humphry. 1957. “Function as the Basis of Psychiatric Ward Design.” Mental Hospitals 8 (4): 23–29.

Pearce, Celia. 2005. “Theory Wars: An Argument Against Arguments in the So-called Ludology/Narratology Debate.” In Changing Views: Worlds in Play: Proceedings of the 2005 Digital Games Research Association Conference, 6. Vancouver. http://www.digra.org/dl/display_html?chid=06278.03452.pdf.

Pelline, Jeff. 1996. “Sega Catapults to the Net.” Cnet. October 22. http://news.cnet.com/Sega-catapults-to-the-Net/2100-1023_3-239291.html.

Pereira, Joseph. 1996. “A Virtual Legend, `Thresh’ Isn’t a Guy To Play Games With — Dennis Fong’s Alter-Ego Has Thousands of On-Line Kills And an Advertising Deal.” Wall Street Journal, August 26.

Putnam, Robert. 2000. Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community. Simon & Schuster.

Ravaja, Niklas, Timo Saari, Marko Turpeinen, Jari Laarni, Mikko Salminen, and Matias Kivikangas. 2006. “Spatial Presence and Emotions During Video Game Playing: Does It Matter with Whom You Play?” Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments 15 (4): 381–392.

Salter, Anastasia, and Bridget Blodgett. 2012. “Hypermasculinity & Dickwolves: The Contentious Role of Women in the New Gaming Public.” Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 56 (3) (July): 401–416. doi:10.1080/08838151.2012.705199.

Schleiner, Anne-Marie. 2004. “Flamer Gallery.” Velvet-Strike. February 20. http://www.opensorcery.net/velvet-strike/mailgallery.html.

Serenity1024. 2011. “Denied Access To a LAN: ‘We No Longer Allow Women to Attend This Event’.” July 22. http://www.reddit.com/r/TwoXChromosomes/comments/ixe2t/denied_access_to_a_lan_we_no_longer_allow_women/?sort=old.

Sherry, John L., Kristen Lucas, Bradley S. Greenberg, and Ken Lachlan. 2006. “Video Game Uses and Gratifications as Predictors of Use and Game Preference.” Playing Video Games: Motives, Responses, and Consequences: 213–224.

Silberman, Steve. 1995. “O Bolo Mio.” Netguide, May.

Silverman, Dwight. 1993. “‘Doom’ Bursts Onto College Computer Networks.” Houston Chronicle, December 15, sec. Business.

Smithville. 2012. “LAN War XXII – A Glimpse Behind the Event.” Vimeo. April 27. http://vimeo.com/41154529 http://video.smithville.net/?p=2440.

Soukup, Charles. 2006. “Computer-mediated Communication as a Virtual Third Place: Building Oldenburg’s Great Good Places on the World Wide Web.” New Media & Society 8 (3) (June 1): 421 –440. doi:10.1177/1461444806061953.

“Spectre.” 1993. Compute!, October.

Steinkuehler, Constance A., and Dmitri Williams. 2006. “Where Everybody Knows Your (Screen) Name: Online Games as ‘Third Places’.” Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 11 (4): 885–909.

Stewart, Kym, and Hyewon Choi. 2003. “PC-Bang (Room) Culture: A Study of Korean College Students’ Private and Public Use of Computers and the Internet.” Trends in Communication 11 (1): 63–79.

Taylor, T. L. 2006. Play Between Worlds: Exploring Online Game Culture. The MIT Press.

Thornham, H. 2011. Ethnographies of the Videogame: Gender, Narrative and Praxis. Ashgate Pub Co.

“Timeline – DTSS – Dartmouth Time Sharing System.” 2011. Accessed February 2. http://dtss.dartmouth.edu/timeline.php.

Tochluk, Shelly. 2010. Witnessing Whiteness: The Need to Talk About Race and How to Do It. Rowman & Littlefield Education.

Trechter, Sara, and Mary Bucholtz. 2001. “Introduction: White Noise: Bringing Language into Whiteness Studies.” Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 11 (1): 3–21. doi:10.1525/jlin.2001.11.1.3.

Trend, David. 2001. Reading Digital Culture. Vol. 4. Wiley-Blackwell.

Turkle, Sherry. 2005. The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit, Twentieth Anniversary Edition. 20th Anniversary. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

———. 2011. Alone Together: Why We Expect More From Technology and Less From Each Other. New York: Basic Books.

Turner, Edith L. B. 2012a. Communitas: The Anthropology of Collective Joy. 1st ed. Contemporary Anthropology of Religion. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

———. 2012b. “Communitas, Rites Of.” In Encyclopedia of Religious Rites, Rituals, and Festivals, edited by Frank A Salamone, 97–101. New York, NY: Routledge.

Turner, Victor W. 1995. The Ritual Process: Structure and Anti-Structure. New York: Aldine de Gruyter.

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“Video Games — Did They Begin at Brookhaven?” 2011. DOE R&D Accomplishments. January 21. http://www.osti.gov/accomplishments/videogame.html.

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Wadley, Greg, Martin Gibbs, and Peter Benda. 2007. “Speaking in Character: Using Voice-Over-IP to Communicate Within MMORPGs.” In Proceedings of the 4th Australasian Conference on Interactive Entertainment, 24. RMIT University.

Wadley, Greg, Martin Gibbs, and Connon Graham. 2004. “Videogames as Third Places.” In  Vienna. https://www.dis.unimelb.edu.au/staff/gwadley/roc/ThirdPlace-VideoGames.pdf; people.eng.unimelb.edu.au/gwadley/pubs/ThirdPlace-VideoGames.pdf.

Walkerdine, Valerie. 2009. Children, Gender, Video Games Towards a Relational Approach to Multimedia. Basingstoke [England] ;;New York, NY :: Palgrave Macmillan,.

Wasserman, Ken, and Tim Stryker. 1980. “Multimachine Games.” Byte, December.

Watercutter, Angela. 2012. “Feminist Take on Games Draws Crude Ridicule, Massive Support.” Wired. June 14. http://www.wired.com/underwire/2012/06/anita-sarkeesian-feminist-games/.

Weibel, David, Bartholomäus Wissmath, Stephan Habegger, Yves Steiner, and Rudolf Groner. 2008. “Playing Online Games Against Computer- Vs. Human-Controlled Opponents: Effects on Presence, Flow, and Enjoyment.” Computers in Human Behavior 24 (5): 2274–2291.

Wetherell, Margaret, and Nigel Edley. 1999. “Negotiating Hegemonic Masculinity: Imaginary Positions and Psycho-Discursive Practices.” Feminism & Psychology 9 (3): 335 –356. doi:10.1177/0959353599009003012.

Whitmire, Ethelene. 2004. “The Campus Racial Climate and Undergraduates’ Perceptions of the Academic Library.” Portal: Libraries and the Academy 4 (3): 363–378. doi:10.1353/pla.2004.0057.

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Williams, Dmitri. 2006. “Why Game Studies Now? Gamers Don’t Bowl Alone.” Games and Culture 1 (1): 13–16.

Williams, Joe, Ted Alpsach, and Guy Vardaman. 2007. “Strategic Conquest 4.0.” Delta Tao. September 13. http://www.deltatao.com/stratcon/stratcon/stratcon.html.

Wingfield, Adia Harvey, and Joe R Feagin. 2010. Yes We Can?: White Racial Framing and the 2008 Presidential Campaign. New York: Routledge.

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Yancy, George. 2004. “Introduction: Fragments of a Social Ontology of Whiteness.” In What White Looks Like: African-American Philosophers on the Whiteness Question, edited by George Yancy, 1–24. Routledge.

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Encyclopedia of Video Games with cool stuff by this guy with the thumbs

An edited collection including my first official publication has been released: Encyclopedia of Video Games [2 volumes]: The Culture, Technology, and Art of Gaming. Edited by Mark J. P. Wolf, it includes a few entries written by me, such as this wonderful, guaranteed 100% accurate and authoritative entries on the history of Sony and the Playstation 1 and 2 (guarantee not valid in any country, world, or timeline):

I’ve included affiliate links to Amazon.com so if you decide to buy the two volume Encyclopedia of Video Games for the low, low price of $189 you can give me a commission:

Or, for my billions of readers in the UK you can buy it for the even more amazing price of £195.24!

If you live somewhere else, well… I don’t have an affiliate code for any other countries so just send me a blank check and I’ll send you a copy in 4-60 months… 😛

In all seriousness, the price may be high but it is two hardcovers and over 700 pages in total. While I can’t speak for the other contributors I know that I put a lot of energy into my entries to make sure they had better and more authoritative information than wikipedia entries (of course now someone can just cite my entries in wikipedia ;-)). I think there is going to be an ebook version out at some point so hopefully it will be available soon.

Some Cultural History of Videogames

I know I am probably a bit late to the game on this but I thought I would share anyway.

C-SPAN has a searchable archive of their videos and included in that archive is some pretty interesting archival footage of the USA government talking about how videogames are teh eval!

For example, here’s a clip from December 9, 1993:

Witnesses testified concerning violence in video games produced for Nintendo and Sega. Graphic scenes from a number of Sega games were shown throughout the hearing.

Pretty cool stuff!

 

Roll on Blogroll, Roll on!

I’m still updating the blogroll. It is taking so long because for each link I’m adding, I’m also trying to look at the blogs they link to. Of course that means I have to look at their links and so on and so on.

Of course I’m not putting every link in the blogroll. I’m trying to be generous but I am also trying to make some (fairly arbitrary) limits on what I’ll link to. Obviously, if someone’s racist, sexist, homophobic, or something like that I’m not going to link to that person’s site. Luckily, I haven’t ran into any blogs that have content like that so far.

Other, perhaps more subtle, criteria include freshness. If someone hasn’t updated in over a year I’m not going to add that person’s blog. I think I’ve written about this before but it does sometimes hurt to cut the blog of a person who has written some really great stuff but seems to have abandoned blogging.

Another criteria: game design. I’m not really into making games so blogs that seem to be overly or exclusively devoted to designing games are proably not blogs I, personally, would enjoy reading. So I’m not linking to them.

The final major category is probably the most controversial: Nintendo. If a blog seems to be too Nintendo-centric, I’m more likely to skip it. While lots of people love Mario and Link, I’m not particularly enamored with them. I haven’t owned a Nintendo console since the NES and while I’ve got a Gameboy Advance SP somewhere, I never really played it. I don’t have anything against Nintendo, I just don’t really have much interest in reading or writing about them or their games. Which is, of course, highly ironic considering my contributions to the upcoming Encyclopedia of Video Games…!

new web host

I’ve switched to a new web host so some things may be broken. hopefully I will get things sorted in the next day or so. I know I have to get my blogroll back but it looks like I’ll have to do that manually so that might take a while.

I think the images are working but other things might be broken so be patient.

If nothing else messing with this is a good excuse to not be writing!

I’m working on updating the links and in the process trimming the blogs that sadly haven’t updated in over a year and adding new blogs I find. If there are any out there I should add, feel free to let me know.

See, I told you so!

In my last post, I wrote about hoping for more work on videogame history that went beyond the now standardized canon of videogame history.

Now, a Gamasutra article explores how even that standardized canon may not be all that accurate. The article shows that when it comes to the early days of videogaming, a lot of the details are fuzzy at best. If, as the article shows, the actual North American release date of Super Mario Bros. can’t be verified, then we have some real work to do.

I wonder if someone could get a kickstarter project funded for a multiyear project to do some in depth archival research and ethnographic work in order to heavily cite some of the history of videogames?

Too Much Videogame History

I thought it would be good to try to provide a brief history of LAN parties and LAN games in the intro to my dissertation. This has turned out to be a surprisingly tough thing to do.

Although there seem to be no shortage of great books about videogame history, there still seems to be some big gaps. As useful as books like The Ultimate History of Video Games, Replay, and Phoenix: The Fall & Rise of Videogames are, I still had a lot of trouble finding the “first” game to allowed people to link together two or more personal computers together and play with one another. I’m not blaming these books at all because in all the history of videogames that is a pretty specific thing to try to find.

Moreover, finding the “first” of anything is pretty tough to do anyway if only in part because of the difficulty in defining what a “videogame” is. For example, Wikipedia has decided that “video” in “video game” traditionally refers to a raster display device if only because people who seems to be most interested in the article have chosen that definition.

I guess what I’m saying is that it would be nice if we could get some “new” history. Something that didn’t rehash the Atari-ET-Nintendo-Tetris highlights. Something that finds out something about the proto-videogames, home computing, and those other things.

Internet Researchers 2011 presentation

As is my habit, here is the powerpoint slides from my presentation for the Association of Internet Researchers conference in Seattle next week:

As is always the case with conference papers this is severely cut down from the actual dissertation chapter. However, I hope that it makes the point that we need to reevaluate and redefine our assumptions regarding the concept of “third places.”